Category

Just Added

Boosting Blood Flow

By | Advanced materials, Bioscience and medicine, Just Added, Technology and interconnectivity | No Comments

How Machine Learning is helping researchers develop medical implants We talk to Dr. Peter Vincent about the various applications of computational fluid dynamics and machine learning in medicine and treatment – from Diabetes to Cardiovascular Disease. Visit The Times website for the article mentioned in this video: https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/implant-may-offer-kidney-patients-easier-dialysis-jbk6cg0tq  

Read More

Spotlight On: The BRAIN Centre

By | Equipment, Just Added | No Comments
Each month we post a new edition to the SES 'Spotlight On...' series, showcasing equipment at our institutions, providing information and case studies for interested researchers/industries, and promoting better use of already available equipment. The Biomarker Research and Imaging for Neuroscience Centre (BRAIN) houses a brand new state-of-the-art 9.4T Bruker preclinical MR scanner and various additional equipment. The BRAIN Centre is a newly refurbished preclinical neuroimaging facility run by a team of staff scientists and focusing on the development of translational biomarkers for neurological and psychiatric disorders using imaging and related techniques. The primary methods are Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy (MRI and...
Read More

Computing’s Key to Vital Gains in Brain Research

By | Bioscience and medicine, Just Added, Technology and interconnectivity, The Data Revolution | No Comments
Often cited as the most complex structure in the Universe, the human brain is only just beginning to surrender some of its best-kept, deepest-held secrets. SES members the University of Oxford and University College London (UCL) are making a major contribution to this breakthrough era in brain research – developing and deploying cutting-edge modelling & simulation, medical imaging and image computing, as well as other computer-based tools, to help reveal how and why injury and illness can compromise the brain’s ability to function. These new insights aren’t just of academic interest; they also offer huge potential to underpin much-needed advances...
Read More

Deep in Thought: How ‘Brainy’ Computers Are Changing Our Lives

By | Bioscience and medicine, Just Added, Popular, The Data Revolution | No Comments
The Fourth Industrial Revolution is here – and together with technologies such as robotics and quantum computing, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is at the heart of this awesome new age of progress and possibilities. Deep learning is a great example. Harnessing computer algorithms inspired by how the brain works, this fast-growing field of AI makes it possible to analyse vast amounts of data and detect patterns and features there – generating insights that can improve and protect lives in areas as diverse as medicine, transport and anti-terrorism. UCL is just one of the SES members currently working at deep learning’s cutting...
Read More

Protecting Patients

By | Bioscience and medicine, Just Added | No Comments

Protecting Patients: early disease detection at Guy’s Hospital Join Prof. Julia Schnabel, one of the doctors and staff at King’s College London/Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital to hear about how new MRI imaging techniques and collaborative research are helping to prevent and diagnose lung cancer, heart disease and other health challenges.

Read More

Powering Up Research: Data Fuelled Innovation

By | Bioscience and medicine, Events, Just Added, The Data Revolution | No Comments
Data Intensive Science is a rapidly emerging, cross disciplinary research challenge already traversing the fields of Materials Science, Bio-medical research, Computational Engineering and Digital Humanities (to name a few). With huge volumes and complex data at the heart of many research projects, advancing the methods used to analyse, manage, and interpret this data is key to facilitating both efficient and reliable science. The significance of the discipline has recently been recognised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) in awarding £20 million to 6 new national supercomputing centres, including the Cambridge Centre for Data Driven Discovery. This event aims to bring...
Read More

Spotlight On: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Multi User Facility

By | Equipment, Just Added | No Comments
Each month we post a new edition to the SES 'Spotlight On...' series, showcasing equipment at our institutions, providing information and case studies for interested researchers/industries, and promoting better use of already available equipment. The UCL X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Multi User Facility holds a suite of two X-ray photoelectron spectrometers (XPS). XPS is a widely used surface analysis technique employed to determine elemental composition and chemical environment. It is used by a very wide range of workers in physical sciences, engineering, medical sciences, etc. Our facility offers access to two spectrometers. Users are trained to run their own samples and analyse their own...
Read More

Powering Up Research: The MMM Hub

By | Advanced materials, Events, Just Added, Popular | No Comments
The significance of High Performance Computing in materials research has recently been recognised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) in the award of £4 million to a consortium of partners to create a new national supercomputing centre, the Materials and Molecular Modelling Hub. The HPC facility that the MMM Hub hosts is known as Thomas, a 17,000 core machine designed to support small to medium sized capacity computing focusing on materials and molecular modelling. The launch of this Tier 2 supercomputer on the 14 September was designed to raise awareness amongst the entire UK Materials and Molecular Modelling community...
Read More

Guest Post: Inspiring New Science

By | Events, Just Added, MMM Hub event | No Comments
Lei Tan is a PhD student from Queen Mary University of London under the guidance of three supervisors: Prof. Martin Dove, Dr Andrei Sapelkin and Dr Alston Misquitta. She is currently studying the structure of metal chalcogenide nanoclusters, in particular a group called magic-size clusters that have an extremely small size (knowledge of their structures at an atomic level is critical for further understanding).  In her work, Tan combines experiment methods (xray total scattering, neutron scattering) and simulation (DFT and Reverse Mont-Carlo modelling), requiring large amounts of CPU time. She is one of the pilot users of the Thomas supercomputer. I...
Read More